Teaching Your Brain to Knit

Brainy Thing:   15:47           Behind the Redwood Curtain:  25:35
Welcome to Episode:  How the Distributive Practice Effect or Spacing Effect can help you learn skills in the fiber Arts.
What we’re learning from our Knitting
Catherine got a lot of satisfaction by completing Laura Nelkin’s Butin Collar.  
http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/butin-collar
Margaret created felted bangles from Mags Kandis’ Bevy of Bangles pattern, http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/bevy-of-banglesfrom the book Gifted, Lovely little things to knit and crochet http://www.amazon.com/Gifted-Lovely-Little-Things-Crochet-ebook/dp/B00DH40MIG/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1by Mags Kandis or get them for free from the Interweave website.  

Brainy Thing:  The Distributive Practice Effect
Catherine talks about the Distributive Practice Effect, first described by Herman Ebbinghaus. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_Ebbinghaus.    In psychology,it is talked about as the Spacing Effect. http://www.aft.org/periodical/american-educator/summer-2002/ask-cognitive-scientist.   Essentially, practicing something a little bit every day is more effective in learning than practicing for a long time for one day a week.  

Behind the Redwood Curtain:   Ferndale, CA, the Victorian Village
Catherine introduces us to Ferndale, CA which has a large number of well preserved Victorian buildings.   It is very well decorated around Christmas time.

Knitting Tip:
Margaret shares a tip from No Sheep for You by Amy Singer:   When knitting socks in Cotton or a yarn with little memory, use ribbing to help the sock
 

Direct download: ep._030_Distributive_Learning_and_Fiber_Arts.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:45pm PST

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